• Research Article

    Work-life Conflicts in the AEC Industry – A Comparative Analysis
    Wei Hu and Kamalesh Panthi
    The Architectural, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry has a culture of long working hours that sometimes extend to weekends. As a result, ... + READ MORE
    The Architectural, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry has a culture of long working hours that sometimes extend to weekends. As a result, construction employees find it challenging to achieve a balance between their work and personal lives. It is believed that there is rarely a clear separation between employees’ work and personal life in the AEC industry. This paper suggests that in order to attract and retain a talented workforce, AEC organizations have to cater for the diverse needs of employees with regard to work-life balance. This paper presents the results of a survey of both professional and managerial employees’ perspective on work-life conflict issues in private and public AEC organizations. Perspectives were found to differ, although not significantly, by employees’ experience, leadership experience, age and gender. Furthermore, most survey respondents noted that their employers did not have a policy or program in place supporting work-life balance initiatives. Finally, although the AEC industry is making strides to improve work-life balance, the effort is lagging behind other industry sectors in providing policies and programs to promote work-life balance through flexible work hours and various other means. - COLLAPSE
    June 2018
  • Research Article

    Stability of Construction Cost-variability Factor Rankings from Professionals’ Perspective: Evidence from Dar es Salaam –Tanzania
    Ms Neema Shabani, Mr. Justine Mselle, Mr. Samwel Alananga Sanga, and Mr. Arbogasti Isidori Kanuti
    This study investigates the stability of professionals’ cost variability factor-rankings across different levels of cost-variability and response scenarios. Descriptive statistics are used ... + READ MORE
    This study investigates the stability of professionals’ cost variability factor-rankings across different levels of cost-variability and response scenarios. Descriptive statistics are used to examine the stability of factor-ranking for 20 cost variability factors and a Multinomial Logistic (MNL) regression model was implemented to examine the stability of cost variability factors across three cost variability levels. The finding on the descriptive statistics indicated that professionals’ factors-rankings are stable only for external factors. The MNL regression results on factor-stability suggested that 8 out of the 20 evaluated factors were unstable determinant of lower cost variability levels. These factors are “risk associated with the project”, “personal bias and poor professionalism of the estimators”, “limited time available to complete the project”, “lack of skills and experience by estimator” “geographical location of projects”, “incomplete & rush designs for estimate”, “unforeseen or unexpected site constraints”, “high class bidders for the contractors”. Similarly lack of experience and large size projects were observed to be unstable as well. These observations suggest that professionals’ view on pre-tender cost variability factor-ranking yields unstable factor rankings hence should not be relied upon as the only mechanisms to mitigate cost related risks in construction projects. - COLLAPSE
    June 2018
Journal Informaiton Agriculture and Life Sciences Research Institute Journal of Construction Engineering and Project Management
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